16 December, 2016

Jimi Hendrix’s 1951 Epiphone FT79 acoustic sold at auction in London earlier this week for a massive £209,000, doubling estimates in an auction that featured a host of other memorabilia from the likes of Prince and David Bowie.

The guitar, owned by Hendrix for almost 3 years, was the instrument which he owned for the longest period of time and as such brought in a lot of interest from guitar collectors worldwide who were prepared to pay much more than the estimates of between £80,000-120,000.

Noel Redding, bass player for the Jimi Hendrix Experience, once said that he remembers Jimi buying the Epiphone “second hand, for about £20, in New York after our first tour of the States”.

The guitar was purchased by Hendrix in 1967 and kept in his London flat where he used it to write many famous riffs and arrangements including his famous cover of Bob Dylan’s “All Along the Watchtower”.

He was banned from using an amplified electric guitar in the Upper Berkeley Street flat due to previous noise complaints so he resorted to working with the acoustic, which spawned on of his biggest hits.

Hendrix eventually gave the instrument to Blue Mink guitarist Alan Parker in 1970, the year of his untimely death aged just 27. The guitar’s legacy wouldn’t stop there though as it went on to feature in recordings by Dusty Springfield, Paul McCartney and David Bowie.

Other notable lots in the sale included a custom Cloud guitar belonging to Prince, which sold for 3 times its lowest estimate for £87,500, as well Keith Richards’ silk jacket which broke the world record for an item of band members clothing when it sold for £35,000.

Entertainment Memorabilia Sale at Bonhams
Prince’s custom Cloud guitar (Right) and Hendrix’s Epiphone (Left)

Hendrix’s musical legacy still shows no signs of slowing down and now Californian researchers have named a newly discovered a plant after the iconic frontman. The plant christened Dudleya hendrixii means Hendrix’s liveforever and is a type of succulent plant with an enormous lifespan.